4.3
48 votes

The Heidelberg Project

4236 Grand River Ave, Detroit, Michigan 48207 USA

Free
Free to Visit
Open Now
Mon 12a-11:59p
  • Independent
  • Credit Cards
    Accepted
  • Wheelchair
    Accessible

“a two block area full of color, symbolism, & intrigue”

The Heidelberg Project is art, energy, and community. It’s an open-air art environment in the heart of an urban community on Detroit’s East Side. Tyree Guyton, founder and artistic director, uses everyday, discarded objects to create a two block area full of color, symbolism, and intrigue. Now in its 25th year, the Heidelberg Project is recognized around the world as a demonstration of the power of creativity to transform lives. The Heidelberg Project is recognized around the world as a demonstration of the power of creativity in creating hope and a bright vision for the future. Some of the houses that remain on Heidelberg Street include the "New White House (formerly Dotty Wotty)", "Number House" along with the Detroit Industrial Gallery, and artist studio/home that was purchased and maintained by Detroit artist Tim Burke. The Heidelberg Project hopes to offer a new approach to the growing problems of urban sprawl and decay facing many American and other international "Shrinking cities". This approach has garnered international attention, especially since the Heidelberg Project continues its maturation. The 20th Anniversary of the Heidelberg Project was celebrated on August 26, 2006, with a community festival, an event that ended a year of special attention. MTV producers filmed a segment for its show Made using the Heidelberg Project as a backdrop. Fashion model Kate Moss visited the Heidelberg Project with photographer Bruce Webber to photograph the City of Detroit for a special edition of W magazine in June 2006. Sound file In 2007, two books were published about the Heidelberg Project. A children's book was written by Linda McLean, and a coffee-table book, entitled Connecting the Dots: Tyree Guyton's Heidelberg Project was published by Wayne State University Press. In 2011, the HP released its first children's book, "Magic Trash: A Story of Tyree Guyton and His Art". In 2008, the project was one of 15 projects representing the United States at the 2008 Venice Architecture Biennale.

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Reviewed by
GeekyExplorers

  • 2 Reviews
  • 5 Helpful
August 07, 2014
Rated 4.0

What a street and what a vision for Tyree Guyton to have. Decades after it started the neighborhood is still in a frightening state of disuse, where ‘city homes’ have more open space than they should have. The street itself is a cacophony of color, polka dots & thought provoking throw-away objects used as art. It’s not everyone’s vision of art, but I found it to be interesting, if not a tad freaky. We walked up & down the street, and found it a little amusing & sad at the traffic of people that would only drive by, not venturing into the art itself. Tip: Get out & walk - it's worth it to get a closer look!

4 people found this review helpful

Reviewed by
cdrewns

  • 2 Reviews
  • 4 Helpful
June 23, 2014
Rated 5.0

Though 6 of the houses burnt down, it is still worth seeing! They are creating art out of the ruins and still making it awesome. Definitely worth a detour; the people are so friendly and Tyee Guyton was there to talk to us on "Heidelberg Television." So rad!

3 people found this review helpful

Reviewed by
25th_Lincoln

  • 4 Reviews
  • 3 Helpful
March 19, 2014

Recently, I believe 6 of these building have burnt down due to arson.

2 people found this review helpful

Reviewed by
justinrichey

  • 1 Review
  • 1 Helpful
May 26, 2017
Rated 4.0

It's a must see and support! But it left a sadness with me. When you think that it is not just a art project from junk. But it's people's lives and neighborhoods. It represents a hardship, that still exists.

1 person found this review helpful

Reviewed by
John

  • 3 Reviews
  • 1 Helpful
July 22, 2014
Rated 5.0

Heartbreaking to see some of the houses burned down, but moving to witness how this area resists against the negative issues around it.

1 person found this review helpful

Reviewed by
jclauterbach

  • 9 Reviews
  • 1 Helpful
July 25, 2016
Rated 4.0

A quirky walk with interesting art.

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Reviewed by
RetroGardenParty

  • 20 Reviews
  • 1 Helpful
May 18, 2016

The entire thing consists of two parallel streets, essentially: Heidelberg St. and Elba Pl. It makes for a cute short drive or walk. Read my full review at https://theoffbeatpath.net/2016/04/24/the-heidelberg-project/ .

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Reviewed by
Violet

  • 19 Reviews
  • 1 Helpful
February 12, 2016
Rated 5.0

So glad I was able to see this. An important part of history and Detroit that I was glad to witness.

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Reviewed by
Cams1968

  • 4 Reviews
  • 0 Helpful
October 21, 2015
Rated 1.0

we could not find this property with the details given here

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Reviewed by
cassidyverde

  • 14 Reviews
  • 8 Helpful
August 18, 2015
Rated 5.0

A great place to stop to really feel some of the soul of Detroit and its residents. A strange, ethereal area to walk through and look at all different types of art. It's always changing as pieces get created and ruined by human and nature alike.

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The Heidelberg Project

4236 Grand River Ave
Detroit, Michigan
48207 USA

Hours

Open 24 hours today
  • Sun - Sat: 12:00 am - 11:59 pm

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  • Independent
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Wheelchair Accessible
  • Street Parking
  • Yes Parking

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