DON'T FORGET TO SAVE YOUR TRIP. CLICK HERE.

3.7
17 votes

Kīlauea Volcano

Kau Desert Trail, Volcano, Hawaii 96778 USA

Tour & Activity Deals

Kilauea Volcano

Volcano National Park Small Group Twilight Tour

Big Island of Hawaii
12 hours
From $200

Volcanoes and Waterfalls Helicopter Adventure from Hilo

Big Island of Hawaii
45 minutes
From $233

Big Island Hawaii Volcano Adventure

Big Island of Hawaii
9 hours 30 minutes
From $102
Free
Free to Visit
  • Independent
  • Credit Cards
    not Accepted
  • Not Wheelchair
    Accessible
  • No Public
    Restrooms
  • No Wifi

“it's a real blast”

Kīlauea (/kiːlaʊˈeɪ.ə/; Hawaiian: [ˈkiːlɔuˈwɛjə]) is a currently active shield volcano in the Hawaiian Islands, and the most active of the five volcanoes that together form the island of Hawaiʻi, and, perhaps, the most active volcano on earth. Located along the southern shore of the island, the volcano is between 300,000 and 600,000 years old and emerged above sea level about 100,000 years ago. It is the second youngest product of the Hawaiian hotspot and the current eruptive center of the Hawaiian–Emperor seamount chain. Because it lacks topographic prominence and its activities historically coincided with those of Mauna Loa, Kīlauea was once thought to be a satellite of its much larger neighbor. Structurally, Kīlauea has a large, fairly recently formed caldera at its summit and two active rift zones, one extending 125 km (78 mi) east and the other 35 km (22 mi) west, as an active fault line of unknown depth moving vertically an average of 2 to 20 mm (0.1 to 0.8 in) per year. Kīlauea's eruptive history has been a long and active one; its name means "spewing" or "much spreading" in the Hawaiian language, referring to its frequent outpouring of lava. The earliest lavas from the volcano date back to its submarine preshield stage, and have been recovered by ROVs from its submerged slopes; other flows have been recovered through core samples. Lavas younger than 1,000 years cover 90 percent of the volcano; the oldest exposed lavas date back 2,800 and 2,100 years. The first well-documented eruption of Kīlauea occurred in 1823, and since that time the volcano has erupted repeatedly. Most historical eruptions have occurred at the volcano's summit or its southwestern rift zone, and are prolonged and effusive in character; however, the geological record shows that violent explosive activity predating European contact was extremely common, and should explosive activity start anew the volcano would become much more dangerous to civilians. Kīlauea's current eruption dates back to January 3, 1983, and is by far its longest-lived historical period of activity, as well as one of the longest-lived eruptions in the world; as of January 2011, the eruption has produced 3.5 cubic kilometres (0.84 cu mi) of lava and resurfaced 123.2 km2 (48 sq mi) of land. Kīlauea's high state of activity has a major impact on its mountainside ecology where plant growth is often interrupted by fresh tephra and drifting volcanic sulfur dioxide, producing acid rains particularly in a barren area south of its southwestern rift zone known as the Kaʻū Desert. Nonetheless, wildlife flourishes where left undisturbed elsewhere on the volcano and is highly endemic thanks to Kīlauea's (and the island of Hawaiʻi's) isolation from the nearest landmass. Historically, the five volcanoes on the island were considered sacred by the Hawaiian people, and in Hawaiian mythology Kīlauea's Halemaumau Crater served as the body and home of Pele, goddess of fire, lightning, wind, and volcanoes. William Ellis, a missionary from England, gave the first modern account of Kīlauea and spent two weeks traveling along the volcano; since its foundation by Thomas Jaggar in 1912, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, located on the rim of Kīlauea caldera, has served as the principal investigative and scientific body on the volcano and the island in general. In 1916 a bill forming the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park was signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson; since then the park has become a World Heritage Site and a major tourist destination, attracting roughly 2.6 million people annually.

Read More >
Add Review
Thanks!
Your Rating
1
2
3
4
5

Reviewed by
Anna Hider

  • Blogger
  • 1,283 Reviews
  • 427 Helpful
June 12, 2015
Rated 4.0

As weird as this might be, definitely check on the status of the volcano before visiting. It's worth it to check out the old footprints from the 18th century, though!

Was this helpful?

Be the first to add a review to the Kīlauea Volcano.

Kīlauea Volcano

Kau Desert Trail
Volcano, Hawaii
96778 USA

Hours not available

Is there a problem with this listing? Let us know.

  • Independent
  • Credit Cards not Accepted
  • Not Wheelchair Accessible
  • No Public Restrooms
  • No Wifi
  • Private Parking
  • Yes Parking
  • Not Haunted

Own this business?

Claim your business to keep your
listing's information up to date.

Claim

Nearby Hotels

Volcano, Hawaii
FastBook

Click to find a
great deal for this hotel

Volcano, Hawaii
FastBook

Click to find a
great deal for this hotel

Volcano, Hawaii
FastBook

Click to find a
great deal for this hotel

Volcano, Hawaii
FastBook

Click to find a
great deal for this hotel

1757968